Internal Career Advancement

This topic contains 10 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Mr.Children 3 weeks, 2 days ago.

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  • #4929

    smokeybandit
    Participant

    I’m a bit nervous but very confident at the same time. Nervous because I have never really advanced into a new position within a workplace before. Very confident because I have an impreasive resume.

    A new career opportunity opened up within my workplace for an Infrastructure Analyst/Network Support position and my Manager advised me to apply into the role. There’s no tenure requirement and it sounds like an amazing opportunity. I’m working on my resume and coverletter.

    Tell me about your experience when you advanced within your company. What were some challenges and how did you overcome it?

  • #4934

    Mr.Children
    Participant

    Sounds like a great opportunity! I think it’s an opportunity for you to learn. Financially, I’m not sure if they’ll give you much or as much as if you went to a different company. Companies know that they got the upperhand if you’re moving within the same company and can negotiate lower pay. It’s a great opportunity to get skills and if you want, jump to a different company and get paid much more. The person who jumps to a different company can make way more than somebody who take years and years moving up the ladder. You can make more at a low position at a different company, than a person who moved up to management.

    I got an internship after college. They pay was low and position was low, but it got my foot in the door. Work there for a few years and when I left, I was getting calls from recruiters left and right…doubled my salary. The thing is, many of my peers and people in general are too embarrassed to take lower positions…so they threw away their chances..and continue to work their shtty jobs. Now I get paid way more than them! They’re too embarrassed to take that low paying job…it’s low because the company is taking a fcking risk on you! Yet at the same time is giving you access to the latest and greatest. It’s like you’re getting paid to go to school! A lot of college graduates missed out on opportunities because they’re entitled to a that higher paying job…so they kept working at the bar until the get that high paying job…when they usually don’t. Nowadays, entry level means internships and most companies prefer to hire internships over college graduates.

     

     

    • #4937

      smokeybandit
      Participant

      What goes hand-in-hand with learning on the job is experience. It’s a great opportunity to experience the new role and its responsibilities. It’s a great opportunity to deploy critical skills while making important decisions for the company. There will be challenges, I’m ready to pull my weight and play my pocket aces.

      I’m going to be completely transparent. I started at this company at the bare minimum. Minimum wage at $14/. Along with that wage are full benefits and a lot of corporate perks (like discounts at Guess at Columbia Sportswear). The new position is at least double that rate. If I get offered, I’ll try to negotiate a higher rate of pay. Their postings do say that they offer competitive rates, so I’ll make sure it truly is competitive.

    • #4941

      Mr.Children
      Participant

      And when you leave the company, you’ll most likely get paid more. That’s the way to go!

    • #4944

      smokeybandit
      Participant

      I’m not interested in leaving the company, only to restart probationary periods and all that other jazz. At this point in my career, I’m looking for stability and working for a leader in my industry is the best route. I think job hopping is good when you’re young in your career as it gives you more experience; however as your career progresses it makes sense to find your home and stick with it. I’m happy where I am at and don’t plan on leaving. I dreaded the worst when starting the job, but the company has turned out to be better than expected.

    • #4965

      Mr.Children
      Participant

      I know that it sounds the opposite, but research shows that those who change jobs are more stable. How? People who go to different companies get to develop different skills, therefore they are more marketable in the market place. That is why people who change jobs get paid more. When you stay at the same company, most likely that it’s the same everyday and there is a limit to what you can learn. Then if they ever get laid off, it’s harder to find a job. Who you think they rather hire? Guy who been at same company for 10 years, or guy who worked at 3 different companies and developed more skills in those 10 years? I’m at a new job for a few months now and already interviewing…more pay. It’s BS that people say that companies don’t want to hire people who job hop. High performing companies are dominated by job hoppers and the manager don’t care if you stay long..he’s leaving too. They just want you to do work for X amount of time..that’s all.

  • #4939

    Pleu
    Participant

    jeyo to u for startin at the bottom n workin ur way up, mdong tiet.

    my 1st internship was on a farm at the age of 15 thru highschool.. entailed gettin up by 4am to samat aich koh, drive plow, n milk em dry 2X day

    notice ppl hav it the easiest indeed when they stick to a big. stable company and move up then retire with a decent pension!

    is it hard balancing ur recording artist endeavors with dayjob?

    • #4940

      smokeybandit
      Participant

      I cant imagine interning at a farm, that just seems like really difficult work. I worked on the fields at a really young age and was never really good at berry picking.

      Its funny that you asked about the recording artist role. I was sayin how that role is pretty much dead now. I enjoyed recording music, but probably enjoyed the technical aspect of the role more, like music production and video editing.

      I’m finding I don’t have much time for any now. Trying to do the podcasting too, but I just don’t have the energy after a long day at work. I want to keep at it though.

    • #4942

      Mr.Children
      Participant

      Nowadays, it’s hard to stay at a company long and if you do, they pay you less.

    • #4967

      smokeybandit
      Participant

      Good for you, you should just hand your resignation in now then! LOL

      I don’t just consider wage as the reason to stay with a company. The co-workers and managers make a difference too. Like the saying goes, people don’t quit jobs, they quit managers.

      So far, I have a great manager and its really easy going at work. I love the corporate culture too. I don’t need to ch jobs and putting everyone at risk, like the risk of having to work with people you don’t like or get along with.

      People at this company so far have long tenure that I talked to, many have been there for 10+ years.

    • #4968

      Mr.Children
      Participant

      It’s what you want at the end of the day. The risk of staying at one place is that you lose a lot of money plus learning opportunities. When you’re around people who stay at one job too long, you’re usually around people who are not as ambitious or their knowledge is limited because they’ve been in one environment for so long.

      I know that manager and culture is important, but especially at the beginning or when your pay is lower, it’s really important to make as much money and gain as much experience as possible. It’s not about making friends, but making money. Jump a few times until you make so much money..then you can stay. The problem with people who stay at one job too long is that they usually do it at the beginning of a career and stay there until they get laid off. When they leave, they don’t know sh*t! They struggle the most looking for jobs.

      And when you switch jobs, you could be making more than a person who has a higher position. I did that and dude from my last job is not happy. He’s stuck with a harder job with older tech, while I do less, learn more, and make more money.

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 2 days ago by  Mr.Children.

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